City of Weed, California

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Planning & Zoning

Planning serves the community by assisting citizens with all aspects of land development. We provide a wide array of comprehensive planning and land use regulatory services to the residents and development community of Weed. Other services provided by this department include:

Plan review for subdivision, multi-family and commercial development, zoning verifications for persons to obtain a business license and those wishing to obtain building permits in the city. Processing rezoning, annexation and variance applications to the Planning Commission and City Council.

The Department receives and processes the following for review by the Planning Commission (and perhaps the City Council):

  • Annexation
  • Rezoning
  • Conditional Use Permits
  • Variance
  • Parcel Map
  • Subdivision
  • Sign Permit
  • Architectural Reviews

The Following are received and processed for review, by the Planning Director:

  • Home Occupation Permit
  • Lot Line Adjustment
  • Second Dwelling Unit Permit
  • Sign Permit

Alternative Transportation Plan (Bike Plan)

Attached is the draft Alternative Transportation Plan.  During approval, the proposal to eliminate parking on Main Street to create a bike lane was eliminated and the path to the Elementary School was modified to a Class 1 path.

Vacant Property Registration

     The City Council has established a mechanism to

  • protect neighborhoods from becoming blighted through the lack of maintenance and security of abandoned, accessible, or distressed real property,
  • to establish a property registration program, and
  • to set forth guidelines for the maintenance of abandoned, accessible, or distressed commercial real property.

      Abandoned means a commercial building, structure, or other real property that is vacant and unoccupied, including property in which forty percent (40%) of the square footage of the gross floor area of the building is vacant.  As used herein, the use of all or a portion of a building for storage is not occupancy unless that storage is itself a business operation or is accessory to an on-going business operation conducted within the same building.  Occupancy under this part means only occupancy by a person with a legal right to occupancy.

      Accessible means real property or structures not secured or open in such a way as to prevent unauthorized access.  Distressed means property which has been vacant for a period of at least six (6) consecutive months.  Owner means the record title holder and any agent of the title holder with the right of possession or access to the property which is the subject of this chapter.  Commercial means a building or structure that is within a commercial zone and is used, in whole or part, for commercial purposes, or an empty lot that is within a commercial zone.

     The full text of the ordinance and the registration form are available at this link. 

Staff

Ronald ("Ron") W. Stock, Acting Planning Director

Office Hours:  Monday-Friday 8:00am to 4:00pm

Location:  550 Main Street, Weed, CA 96094

Contact Numbers T: 530-938-5020 F: 530-938-5096

E-mail:  stock@ci.weed.ca.us

Mailing Address:  P.O.Box 470, Weed, CA 96094

Variance

What is the purpose of a Variance?

A variance is a method by which a property owner may seek relief from the strict interpretation of the zoning ordinance because of an unusual physical circumstance of the property.  Variances are not granted to permit a use on the property other than that for which it is zoned, or for economic hardships.

How do I apply far a Variance?

Your application may be prepared by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, licensed land surveyor, professional planner, or yourself and submitted to the Planning Department for review.  Your application must include a detailed description of the use you wish to make of the property, the Assessor’s Parcel Number, and the name and address of the property owner and of the person making the application. Submit the following with your application:

  • Photographs of the property, a location map and a scaled plot plan showing everything that exists on the parcel (buildings and uses, parking area, driveways, well, septic system, setbacks, and lot dimensions) and proposed uses including signage, exterior lighting and landscaping.
  • A floor plan and the elevations of any proposed buildings.
  • A radius map showing all the parcels within 300 feet of your property and one stamped legal-size envelope for each property identified.

What happens after I apply?

The Planning Department will review your application and also refer it to various departments within the City who may request that conditions be attached to the approval of your variance.  A project planner may visit the site.  Your application is reviewed by the Planning Director and may be recommended to the Planning Commission for approval, approval subject to conditions, or to be denied.  The application is then scheduled for a Planning Commission hearing at which neighbors or other interested persons may appear to support, object, or simply ask questions about your proposal. The Planning Department will announce the meeting by mailing notices to all owners of property within 300 feet of your property and by posting the agenda on the city hall bulletin board.

Depending upon the complexity of the project, the final decision may be made by the Planning Commission. Your application may be approved, approved subject to certain conditions (nearly all approvals do have conditions), or denied.

What determines whether my application will be approved?

The following findings must first be made before a variance can be considered:

  • The variance shall not constitute a grant of special privilege inconsistent with the limitations upon other properties in the vicinity and zoning district in which the subject property is located.
  • That because of special circumstances applicable to the subject property, including size, shape, topography, location or surroundings, the strict application of the Zoning Ordinance is found to deprive subject property of privileges enjoyed by other properties in the vicinity and under identical zone classification.

Based on the information you supply and established criteria, the City determines whether the use you wish to make of your property will be detrimental to the public welfare or injurious, to property or improvements in the neighborhood.

What types of conditions might be imposed?

Your variance might be required to make certain property improvements before you can receive approval.  Ensuring that your variance does not supersede deed restrictions may be listed as a condition.

What can I do to give my application the best chance of approval?

  • When planning your project, consider how you can complete it in such away that it harmonizes with its surroundings and does not disrupt the neighborhood by creating undue noise or traffic.
  • You must demonstrate that your plan should be approved. When your application is submitted, make sure the most accurate information is provided.
  • Attend hearings so that you can speak for your project and respond to questions posed by those who may be worried about how your land use might affect them.

Can I appeal the decision?

During the 5-day appeal period after the Planning Commission’s decision is made, you and any other interested party may appeal the decision to the City Council. Even if your application is approved, you may still appeal any of the conditions that are attached.  The City Council may reverse, set aside, affirm, amend or modify the action of the Planning Commission.

How long does it take to get a Variance?

The entire process takes approximately two to three months from the time you submit a completed application to the day of the hearing by the Planning Commission. The Planning Department staff will assign a tentative hearing date when your application is complete.  Regular Planning Commission meetings are on the third Wednesday of each month.

What fees must I pay?

You must pay an application fee. You may also be required to pay fees for preparation and processing the City environmental review, archaeological review by the Northeast Information Center and environmental review by the Department of Fish & Game, and a County Clerk fee for posting the environmental determination.

What’s the next step in this process?

Obtain a Variance application packet from the Planning Department. The packet explains the general procedures for applying for a variance, fees, and other related matters. The application must be completed by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, licensed land surveyor, professional planner, or yourself and have notarized signature by the property owner or owners.

You should also review the section of the City Zoning Ordinance that regulates the uses permitted in the zone in which your project is located (a Planner can help you identify which section of the ordinance you need). After you have become familiar with these documents, we recommend you prepare some very preliminary plans and bring them to the Planning Department counter so that staff can review them.

If you are new to Weed or unfamiliar with the permit system you may also wish to make an appointment to meet with staff who can explain the permit system, the different agencies involved and the various costs and requirements. There is no charge for the meeting that can be scheduled by calling (530) 938-5020.

 

Home Occupations Permit

What is a Home Occupation?

A Home Occupation is a small-scale business in the home allowed in residential and agricultural zoning districts and conducted for the purposes of developing personal and professional skills. A Home Occupation permit is allowed where there is an existing residence. It is conducted on the premises by the occupant of the dwelling as a secondary use in connection with living in the residence.

The following criteria shall be used for the determination of a home occupation:

  • There shall be no employment of help other than the members of the resident family.
  • There shall be no use of material or mechanical equipment not recognized as being part of normal household or hobby uses.
  • The use shall not generate pedestrian or vehicular traffic or noise or electronic interference beyond that normal to the zone in which it is located.
  • There shall be no excessive, unsightly or hazardous storage of materials, supplies, or equipment, indoors or outdoors.
  • It shall not involve the use of signs or structures other than those permitted in the zone of which it is a part.
  • Not more than one room in the dwelling shall be employed by the home occupation, nor more than one out-building.
  • In no way shall the appearance of the structure be so altered or the conduct of the occupation within the structure be such that the structure may be reasonably recognized as servicing a nonresidential use.
  • The granting of a permit for home occupations does not exempt the permittee from the state and local regulations regarding the business licenses, sales tax permits and professional restrictions.

The Planning Department will provide you with zoning information. It is helpful to have your Assessor’s Parcel Number with you to identify your property.

How do I apply for a Home Occupation Permit?

Your completed application form is submitted to the Planning Department for review and must include the Assessors Parcel Number and the name and address of the property owner and of the person making the application. The applicant may complete the application, however, the property owner must sign the application and have it notarized. You are also asked to submit the following information items with your application:

  • A location map and a full plot plan showing everything that exists on the parcel (buildings and uses, parking area, driveways, well, septic system, setbacks, and lot dimensions) and proposed uses.
  • A floor plan and the elevations of any proposed buildings.
  • A radius map showing all the parcels within 300 feet of your property and one stamped legal-sized envelope for each property identified.
  • A copy of the grant deed is required identifying property ownership.

What happens after I apply?

The Planning Department will review your application and also refer it to various departments within the City who may request that conditions be attached to the approval of your home occupation permit.  A project planner may visit the site.  The application is then scheduled for an administrative hearing by the Planning Director at which neighbors or other interested persons may appear to support, object, or simply ask questions about your proposal. The Planning Department will announce the meeting by mailing notices to all owners of property within 300 feet of your property and by posting the agenda on the city hall bulletin board.

Depending upon the complexity of the project, the final decision may be made by the Planning Director. Your application may be approved, approved subject to certain conditions (nearly all approvals do have conditions), or denied.

What determines whether my application will be approved?

Based on the information you supply and established criteria, the City determines whether the use you wish to make of your property will be detrimental to the public welfare or injurious to property or improvements in the neighborhood.

What types of conditions might be imposed?

You might be required to make certain property improvements before you can receive approval. City street and yard setbacks may be listed as a condition, as well as ensuring that your permit does not supersede deed restrictions.

What can I do to give my application the best chance of approval?

  • When planning your project, consider how you can complete it in such away that it harmonizes with its surroundings and does not disrupt the neighborhood by creating undue noise or traffic.
  • You must demonstrate that your plan should be approved. When your application is submitted, make sure the most accurate information is provided.
  • Attend hearings so that you can speak for your project and respond to questions posed by those who may be worried about how your land use might affect them.

Can I appeal the decision?

During the 5-day appeal period after the Planning Director’s decision is made, you or any other interested party may appeal the decision to the Planning Commission. Even if your application is approved, you may still appeal any of the conditions that are attached.

How long does it take to get a Home Occupation Permit?

The entire process takes approximately 30 days from the time you submit a completed application to the Directors decision.

If you appeal the decision, Planning Department staff will assign a tentative hearing date when your appeal can be heard.  Planning Commission meetings are on the first Wednesday of each month.

What fees must I pay?

You must pay an application fee.  If the home occupation permit is approved you must pay fees for a business license.

What’s the next step in this process?

Obtain a Home Occupation application packet from the Planning Department. The application packet explains the general procedures for applying for a permit, fees, and other related matters.  The applicant may complete the application, however, a notarized signature by the property owner is required..

You should also review the section of the City Zoning Ordinance that regulates the zone in which your project is located (a Planner can help you identify which section of the ordinance you need). After you have become familiar with these documents, we recommend you prepare some very preliminary plans and bring them to the Planning Department counter so that staff can review them.

You may also want to visit other City and County departments (Building Department, Health Department, Tax Collector) to find out other requirements that may be conditions of the Home Occupation Permit.

If you are new to Weed or unfamiliar with the permit system you may also wish to make an appointment to meet with staff who can explain the permit system, the different agencies involved and the various costs and requirements. There is no charge for the meeting that can be scheduled by calling (530) 938-5020.

Lot Line Adjustment

What is the purpose of a Lot Line Adjustment?

Two or more property owners normally request a lot line adjustment so that one or all of them can make better use of their property, or one property owner may chose to combine or adjust adjacent properties. Sometimes, because of the physical layout of the land, moving the line makes for easier upkeep, for compliance with zoning regulations, a more salable lot, facilitate management or enables one of the owners to add an amenity such as a garage or enlarge their home or building.

How do I apply for a Lot Line Adjustment?

The application must be submitted on a City of Weed application form.  Your application, prepared by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, or licensed land surveyor, is submitted to the Planning Department for review.  Submit the following with your application:

  • A preliminary title report (no more than six months old) and a copy of the title (vesting) documents of all the parcels involved.
  • Notarized written consent of the affected property owner or owners (on the application form).
  • A location map and a scaled plot plan showing the existing parcels and everything that exists on the parcels (buildings and uses, parking area, driveways, well, septic system, setbacks, and lot dimensions), boundaries of the parcels after the adjustment, and proposed uses.
  • Legal description of the parcels after the adjustment.
  • Evidence of any variances, encroachment permits, or other entitlement to deviation from existing zoning law requirements.
  • Evidence of legal and physical access to the parcel.
  • Evidence that all property taxes are current for all of the affected parcels.
  • Current application fee.
  • Title company that will receive the report from the City and record the completed lot line adjustment.

What happens after I apply?

The Planning Department will review your application and also refer it to various departments within the City who may request that conditions be attached to the approval of your lot line adjustment.  A project planner may visit the site.  Your application is reviewed by the Planning Director and may be approved, approved subject to conditions, or denied.

What determines whether my application will be approved?

Based on the information you supply and established criteria, the City determines whether the lot line adjustment you wish to make will be detrimental to the public welfare or injurious to property or improvements in the neighborhood. In general, the City wants to ensure that you are not creating substandard parcels or nonconforming circumstances. Typically your proposal will be reviewed for conformance with zoning and building regulations, suitability of the building site, access, water supply and sewage disposal.

What effect will the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) have on my application?

Most lot line adjustments are exempt from the requirements of CEQA.  Certain circumstances may require further environmental review.

What happens when I receive approval or a conditional approval?

The Planning Department will forward to the title company the approved legal descriptions to process and record.  Any conditions that may be required must first be met before instructions are given to the title company to proceed.

What can I do to give my application the best chance of approval?

When planning your project, consider how you can complete it in such a way that zoning provisions are maintained, access is adequately provided, and development such as on-site sewage disposal remain functional.

You must demonstrate that your plan should be approved. When your application is submitted, make sure it is complete and the most accurate information is provided.

Can I appeal the decision?

During the l0-day appeal period after the Planning Director’s decision is made, you and any other interested party may appeal the decision to the Planning Commission. Even if your application is approved, you may still appeal any of the conditions that are attached to the approval.

How long does it take to get a Lot Line Adjustment?

Normally, the entire process takes approximately 7-30 days from the time your application is complete. The period may be longer if the adjustment is complex or if reviewing departments require additional information.

What’s the next step in this process?

Obtain a lot line adjustment application packet from the Planning Department. The packet explains the general procedures for applying for the adjustment, fees, and other related matters. The application must be completed by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, or licensed land surveyor and have notarized signature by the property owner or owners.

You should also review the section of the City Zoning Ordinance that regulates the uses permitted in the zone in which your project is located (a Planner can help you identify which section of the ordinance you need). After you have become familiar with these documents, we recommend you prepare some very preliminary plans and bring them to the Planning Department counter so that a planner can review them.

If you are new to Weed or unfamiliar with the permit system you may also wish to make an appointment to meet with staff who can explain the permit system, the different agencies involved and the various costs and requirements. There is no charge for the meeting that can be scheduled by calling (530) 938-5020.

 

Parcel Map

What is a Parcel Map?

A parcel map is the division of land into four or fewer lots, parcels or other units of land for the purpose of sale, lease or finance.

What determines the size of parcels that can be created?

The zoning districts and General Plan designations define the parcel sizes that can be created in a parcel map.  Health Department regulations on acceptable water supply and sewage disposal can also determine minimum lot sizes.

How do I apply far a Tentative Parcel Map?

Your application, prepared by a registered civil engineer or licensed land surveyor is submitted to the Planning Department for review.  Your application must include a detailed description of the use you wish to make of the property, the Assessor’s Parcel Number, and the name and address of the property owner and of the person making the application. The application itself consists of the tentative map, a completed environmental information form and the processing fees. Submit the following with your application:

  • Photographs of the property, a location map and a scaled plot plan showing everything that exists on the parcel (buildings and uses, parking area, driveways, well septic system, setbacks, and lot dimensions) and proposed uses including signage, exterior lighting and landscaping.
  • A floor plan and the elevations of any proposed buildings.
  • Environmental Information Form.
  • Proof of property ownership. If you do not own the property, submit evidence that the owner agrees with your application.
  • A radius map showing all the parcels within 300 feet of your property and two stamped legal-size envelopes for each property identified.
  • A preliminary title report no more than six months old.
  • A reduced copy of the exhibit maps (8-1/2” x 11” maximum)
  • Fees.

What happens after I apply?

The Planning Department will review your projects status under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) to determine if it is exempt from environmental review, if it will require a negative declaration or if it will possibly require an Environmental Impact Report. Then, Planning will review your materials and also refer it to various departments within the City who may request that conditions be attached to the approval of your parcel map.  A project planner may visit the site.  Your application is reviewed by the Planning Director and may be recommended to the Planning Commission for approval, approval subject to conditions, or to be denied.  The application is then scheduled for a public hearing by the Planning Commission, at which members of the public may appear to support, object to, or simply ask questions about your proposal. The Planning Department will announce the meeting by mailing notices to all owners of property within 300 feet of yours and by placing a notice in a local newspaper.

At the close of the public hearing, the Planning Commission will make a recommendation to the City Council for their consideration. The City Council then conducts a public hearing to consider the Planning Commission’s recommendation and decides on your proposal.

What criteria will the City use in deciding on my application?

An approved project must meet the following legal requirements:

  • The proposed map is consistent with applicable general plans and policies.
  • The design or improvement of the proposed subdivision is consistent with applicable general and specific plans.
  • The site is physically suitable for the type of development.
  • The site is physically suitable for the proposed density of development
  • The design of the subdivision or the proposed improvements will not cause substantial environmental damage nor substantially and avoidably injure fish or wildlife or their habitat.
  • The design of the subdivision or type of improvements will not cause serious public health problems.
  • The design of the subdivision or the type of improvements will not conflict with easements, acquired by the public at large by easements of record or adjudication, for access through or use of, property within the proposed subdivision.

What happens when I receive approval?

Normally, a tentative map is approved with conditions from various City departments. Once you have met those conditions and your final map has been recorded with the County Clerk you may apply for your Building Permits.

How long does the process take?

Normally! It takes about 3 to 4months to receive approval and up to one year following the approval for you to have the documents recorded and meet any conditions for approval. Department staff will assign a tentative hearing date when your application is complete.  Planning Commission meetings are on the third Wednesday of each month and their action is recommended and referred to the City Council who meets on the second Thursday of each month.

What fees must I pay?

You must pay an application fee. You will also be required to pay fees for preparation and processing the City environmental review, City Engineer review, archaeological review by the Northeast Information Center and environmental review by the Department of Fish & Game, and a County Clerk fee for posting the environmental determination.

What’s the next step in this process?

Obtain a parcel map application packet from the Planning Department. The packet explains the general procedures for applying for a parcel map, fees, and other related matters. The application must be completed by a registered civil engineer or licensed land surveyor and have notarized signature by the property owner or owners.

You should also review the section of the City Zoning Ordinance that regulates the uses permitted in the zone in which your project is located (a Planner can help you identify which section of the ordinance you need). After you have become familiar with these documents, we recommend you prepare some very preliminary plans and bring them to the Planning Department counter so that staff can review them.

If you are new to Weed or unfamiliar with the permit system you may also wish to make an appointment to meet with staff who can explain the permit system, the different agencies involved and the various costs and requirements. There is no charge for the meeting that can be scheduled by calling (530) 938-5020.

Rezoning

What is rezoning?

The City has been divided into different types of zoning districts to make sure that people use their properties in a way that is compatible with the surrounding neighborhood and resources. What you may do with your property depends upon the zoning district in which your property is located.

In an R-1 district, for example, you may build a single-family home. If you have a use permit, you may also build certain other related structures such as a church, school or hospital. However, you may not build an industrial plant

Under certain conditions, you can have your property rezoned. Rezoning changes the uses you are permitted to make of your property.

Rezoning frequently is a very involved process. Certain rezoning requests may require that the City amend its General Plan.

How do I apply for a rezoning?

Your application may be prepared by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, licensed land surveyor, professional planner, or yourself and submitted to the Planning Department for review.  Your application must identify the property and describe the current zoning and use and its proposed zoning and use, the Assessor’s Parcel Number, and the name and address of the property owner and of the person making the application. Submit the following with your application:

  • A brief of written statement justifying your request.
  • Photographs of the property.
  • Proof of property ownership (grant deed).  If you do not own the property, submit evidence that the owner agrees with your request for rezoning.
  • A location map.
  • Site plans showing the existing use and proposed use of the property and a full plot plan showing everything that exists on the parcel (buildings and uses, parking area, driveways, well, septic system, setbacks, and lot dimensions) and proposed uses including signage, exterior lighting and landscaping.
  • Depending upon the nature of your project you may have to submit building elevations and floor plans.
  • A radius map showing all the parcels within 300 feet of your property and two stamped legal-size envelopes for each property identified.
  • Fees.

What happens after I apply?

The Planning Department will review your application and also refer it to various organizations ranging from state and local agencies to various departments within the City for review.  A project planner may visit the site.  The application is then scheduled for a public hearing by the Planning Commission, at which members of the public may appear to support, object to, or simply ask questions about your proposal. The Planning Department will announce the meeting by mailing notices to all owners of property within 300 feet of yours and by placing a notice in a local newspaper.

At the close of the public hearing, the Planning Commission will make a recommendation to the City Council for their consideration. The City Council then schedules the hearing to consider the Planning Commis­sion’s recommendation and decides on your proposal. If approved, an ordinance is adopted with the first reading after the hearing, and a second reading normally at the City Council’s next regular meeting.  The rezoning becomes effective 30 days after the second reading of the zone change ordinance.

What effect will the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) have on my application?

An environmental review in accordance with the CEQA process and procedures will be required.

How long does the rezoning process take?

The process takes up to six months, depending upon the complexity of the application and the number of hearings required. The Planning Commission meets the third Wednesday of each month and their action is recommended and referred to the City Council who meet on the second Thursday of each month.

What fees must I pay?

You must pay an application fee. You will also be required to pay fees for preparation and processing the City environmental review, archaeological review by the Northeast Information Center and environmental review by the Department of Fish & Game, and a County Clerk fee for posting the environmental determination.

What’s the next step in this process?

Obtain a Rezone application packet from the Planning Department. The packet explains the general procedures for applying for a rezoning, fees, and other related matters. The application must be completed by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, licensed land surveyor, professional planner, or yourself and have notarized signature by the property owner or owners.

You should also review the section of the City Zoning Ordinance that regulates the uses permitted in the zone in which your project is located (a Planner can help you identify which section of the ordinance you need). After you have become familiar with these documents, we recommend you prepare some very preliminary plans and bring them to the Planning Department counter so that staff can review them.

If you are new to Weed or unfamiliar with the permit system you may also wish to make an appointment to meet with staff who can explain the rezone process, the different agencies involved and the various costs and requirements. There is no charge for the meeting that can be scheduled by calling (530) 938-5020.

 

Second Dwelling Unit Permit

What is Second Dwelling Unit?

Second Dwelling Housing (SDH) is a provision of State law which allows a second dwelling unit for housing on parcels zoned for single-family or multiple family residences. A second dwelling unit may be established by the conversion of an attic, basement, or other portion of the existing house or a detached second unit may be constructed.

The Planning Department will provide you with zoning information. It is helpful to have your Assessor’s Parcel Number with you to identify your property.

Second Dwelling Housing requires an approved permit prior to installation or construction of the second dwelling. There are certain requirements that must be met:

  • There must be an existing house on the property.
  • The maximum square footage for the additional dwelling unit is 1,200 square feet.
  • The dwelling unit maybe attached or detached or may be a mobile home.
  • If the dwelling is attached, it cannot increase the floor area of the primary residence by more than 30 percent.
  • The owner of the property must occupy either the main unit or the second dwelling unit.
  • The unit is not intended for sale.
  • All zoning requirement must be met.

How do I apply for an Second Dwelling Unit Permit?

Your application may be prepared by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, licensed land surveyor, professional planner, or yourself and submitted to the Planning Department for review.  Your application must include the square footage of the second dwelling unit, the Assessor’s Parcel Number, and the name and address of the property owner and of the person making the application. Submit the following with your application:

  • Photographs of the property, a location map and a scaled plot plan showing everything that exists on the parcel (buildings and uses, parking area, driveways, well, septic system, setbacks, and lot dimensions) together with the proposed location of the second dwelling unit.
  • A floor plan and the elevations of any proposed buildings.

What happens after I apply?

The Planning Department will review your application and also refer it to various departments within the City who may request that conditions be attached to the approval of your home occupation permit.  A project planner may visit the site.

Your application is reviewed by the Planning Director and may be approved, approved subject to certain conditions (nearly all approvals do have conditions), or denied.

What determines whether my application will be approved?

Based on the information you supply and established criteria, the City determines whether the use you wish to make of your property will be detrimental to the public welfare or injurious to property or improvements in the neighborhood.

What types of conditions might be imposed?

You might be required to make certain property improvements before you can receive approval. Maintain yard setbacks may be listed as a condition, as well as ensuring that your permit does not supersede deed restrictions.

What can I do to give my application the best chance of approval?

  • When planning your project, consider how you can complete it in such away that it harmonizes with its surroundings and does not disrupt the neighborhood by creating undue noise or traffic.
  • You must demonstrate that your plan should be approved. When your application is submitted, make sure the most accurate information is provided.

Can I appeal the decision?

During the 30-day appeal period after the Planning Director’s decision is made, you or any other interested party may appeal the decision to the City Council. Even if your application is approved, you may still appeal any of the conditions that are attached.

How long does it take to get a Second Dwelling Unit Permit?

The entire process takes approximately 30 to 45 days from the time you submit a completed application to the Director’s decision.

If you appeal the decision, the City Clerk will assign a tentative hearing date when your appeal can be heard. The City Council meetings are on the second Thursday of each month.

What fees must I pay?

You must pay an application fee and recording fees.

Note: Development of a second dwelling unit may be subject to school fees.

What’s the next step in this process?

Obtain a Second Dwelling Unit application packet from the Planning Department. The packet explains the general procedures for applying for a permit, fees, and other related matters. The application must be completed by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, licensed land surveyor, professional planner, or yourself and have notarized signature by the property owner or owners.

You should also review the section of the City Zoning Ordinance that regulates the zone in which your project is located (a Planner can help you identify which section of the ordinance you need). After you have become familiar with these documents, we recommend you prepare some very preliminary plans and bring them to the Planning Department counter so that staff can review them.

If you are new to Weed or unfamiliar with the permit system you may also wish to make an appointment to meet with staff who can explain the permit system, the different agencies involved and the various costs and requirements. There is no charge for the meeting that can be scheduled by calling (530) 938-5020.

Sign Permit

What is the purpose of a Sign Permit?

The overall goal of signage is to promote a citywide imagery that encourages a harmony among individual business signage.  The local records of winds require sign structural design to meet the extraordinary conditions for public safety.  The sign permit process provides the review process to implement the enhancement and maintenance of the commercial quality and safety of the community.

How do I apply for a Sign Permit?

Your application may be prepared by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, licensed land surveyor, professional planner, or yourself and submitted to the Planning Department for review.  Your application must include a detailed description of the signage you wish to place on the property, the Assessor’s Parcel Number, and the name and address of the property owner and of the person making the application. Submit the following with your application:

  • Plot plan showing everything that exists on the parcel (buildings and uses, parking area, driveways, well, septic system, setbacks, and lot dimensions) and proposed signage.
  • Plans of the completed proposed sign certified by a registered professional engineer.
  • Evidence that no existing signs will be obscured by the proposed sign.
  • Evidence of sign maintenance.

What happens after I apply?

The Planning Department will review your application and also refer it to various departments within the City who may request that conditions be attached to the approval of your sign permit.  A project planner may visit the site.  Your application is reviewed by the Planning Director and may be recommended to the Planning Commission for approval, approval subject to conditions, or to be denied.  The application is then scheduled for a Planning Commission hearing at which neighbors or other interested persons may appear to support, object, or simply ask questions about your proposal. The Planning Department will announce the meeting by posting the agenda on the city hall bulletin board.

Depending upon the complexity of the project, the final decision may be made by the Planning Commission. Your application may be approved, approved subject to certain conditions (nearly all approvals do have conditions), or denied.

What determines whether my application will be approved?

Based on the information you supply and established criteria, the City determines whether the use you wish to make of your property will be detrimental to the public welfare and safety or injurious, to property or improvements in the neighborhood.

What can I do to give my application the best chance of approval?

  • When planning your project, consider how you can complete it in such away that it harmonizes with its surroundings and does not disrupt the neighborhood such as by obscuring other signs.
  • You must demonstrate that your plan should be approved. When your application is submitted, make sure the most accurate information is provided.
  • Attend hearings so that you can speak for your project and respond to questions posed by those who may be worried about how your request might affect them.

Can I appeal the decision?

During the 5-day appeal period after the Planning Commission’s decision is made, you and any other interested party may appeal the decision to the City Council. Even if your application is approved, you may still appeal any of the conditions that are attached.  The City Council may reverse, set aside, affirm, amend or modify the action of the Planning Commission.

How long does it take to get a Sign Permit?

The entire process takes approximately one to two months from the time you submit a completed application to the day of the hearing by the Planning Commission. The Planning Department staff will assign a tentative hearing date when your application is complete.  Regular Planning Commission meetings are on the third Wednesday of each month.

What fees must I pay?

You must pay an application fee. You may also be required to pay fees for consultants the City may be required to hire to process your application.

What’s the next step in this process?

Obtain a Sign Permit application packet from the Planning Department. The packet explains the general procedures for applying for a permit, fees, and other related matters. The application must be completed by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, licensed land surveyor, professional planner, or yourself and have notarized signature by the property owner or owners.

You should also review the section of the City Zoning Ordinance that regulates the uses permitted in the zone in which your project is located (a Planner can help you identify which section of the ordinance you need). After you have become familiar with these documents, we recommend you prepare some very preliminary plans and bring them to the Planning Department counter so that staff can review them.

If you are new to Weed or unfamiliar with the permit system you may also wish to make an appointment to meet with staff who can explain the permit system, the different agencies involved and the various costs and requirements. There is no charge for the meeting that can be scheduled by calling (530) 938-5020.

Subdivision

What is a Subdivision?

A subdivision is the division of land into five or more lots, parcels or other units of land for the purpose of sale, lease or finance.  It includes condominiums, community apartments, or the conversion of a dwelling to a stock cooperative containing five or more dwelling units.

What determines the size of parcels that can be created?

The zoning districts and General Plan designations define the parcel sizes that can be created in a subdivision.  Health Department regulations on acceptable water supply and sewage disposal can also determine minimum lot sizes.

How do I apply far a Subdivision?

Your application, prepared by a registered civil engineer or licensed land surveyor is submitted to the Planning Department for review.  Your application must include a detailed description of the use you wish to make of the property, the Assessor’s Parcel Number, and the name and address of the property owner and of the person making the application. The application itself consists of the tentative map, a completed environmental information form and the processing fees. Submit the following with your application:

  • Photographs of the property, a location map and a scaled plot plan showing everything that exists on the parcel (buildings and uses, parking area, driveways, well septic system, setbacks, and lot dimensions) and proposed uses including signage, exterior lighting and landscaping.
  • A floor plan and the elevations of any proposed buildings.
  • Environmental Information Form.
  • Proof of property ownership. If you do not own the property, submit evidence that the owner agrees with your application.
  • A radius map showing all the parcels within 300 feet of your property and two stamped legal-size envelopes for each property identified.
  • A vicinity map (accurate to the nearest 1/10 mile) showing the nearest readily identifiable street intersection or landmark.
  • A preliminary title report no more than six months old.
  • A reduced copy of the exhibit maps (11” x 17” maximum)
  • Fees.

What happens after I apply?

The Planning Department will review your projects status under the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) to determine if it is exempt from environmental review, if it will require a negative declaration or if it will possibly require an Environmental Impact Report. Then, Planning will review your materials and also refer it to various departments within the City who may request that conditions be attached to the approval of your subdivision.  A project planner may visit the site.  Your application is reviewed by the Planning Director and may be recommended to the Planning Commission for approval, approval subject to conditions, or to be denied.  The application is then scheduled for a public hearing by the Planning Commission, at which members of the public may appear to support, object to, or simply ask questions about your proposal. The Planning Department will announce the meeting by mailing notices to all owners of property within 300 feet of yours and by placing a notice in a local newspaper.

At the close of the public hearing, the Planning Commission will make a recommendation to the City Council for their consideration. The City Council then conducts a public hearing to consider the Planning Commission’s recommendation and decides on your proposal.

What criteria will the City use in deciding on my application?

An approved project must meet the following legal requirements:

  • The proposed map is consistent with applicable general plans and policies.
  • The design or improvement of the proposed subdivision is consistent with applicable general and specific plans.
  • The site is physically suitable for the type of development.
  • The site is physically suitable for the proposed density of development
  • The design of the subdivision or the proposed improvements will not cause substantial environmental damage nor substantially and avoidably injure fish or wildlife or their habitat.
  • The design of the subdivision or type of improvements will not cause serious public health problems.
  • The design of the subdivision or the type of improvements will not conflict with easements, acquired by the public at large by easements of record or adjudication, for access through or use of, property within the proposed subdivision.

What happens when I receive approval?

Normally, a tentative map is approved with conditions from various City departments. Once you have met those conditions and your final map has been recorded with the County Clerk you may apply for your Building Permits.

How long does the process take?

Normally! It takes about 3 to 4months to receive approval of the tentative map and up to one year following the approval for you to have the documents recorded and meet any conditions for approval. Department staff will assign a tentative hearing date when your application is complete.  Planning Commission meetings are on the third Wednesday of each month and their action is recommended and referred to the City Council who meets on the second Thursday of each month.

What fees must I pay?

You must pay an application fee. You will also be required to pay fees for preparation and processing the City environmental review, City Engineer review, archaeological review by the Northeast Information Center and environmental review by the Department of Fish & Game, and a County Clerk fee for posting the environmental determination.

What’s the next step in this process?

Obtain a subdivision application packet from the Planning Department. The packet explains the general procedures for applying for a subdivision, fees, and other related matters. The application must be completed by a registered civil engineer or licensed land surveyor and have notarized signature by the property owner or owners.

You should also review the section of the City Zoning Ordinance that regulates the uses permitted in the zone in which your project is located (a Planner can help you identify which section of the ordinance you need). After you have become familiar with these documents, we recommend you prepare some very preliminary plans and bring them to the Planning Department counter so that staff can review them.

If you are new to Weed or unfamiliar with the permit system you may also wish to make an appointment to meet with staff who can explain the permit system, the different agencies involved and the various costs and requirements. There is no charge for the meeting that can be scheduled by calling (530) 938-5020.

Use Permit

What is the purpose of a Use Permit?

Throughout the City people use their properties in many different ways.  They build homes, apartments, office buildings, gas stations, stores, restaurants, and many other types of facilities. Use Permits ensure that special uses people make of their properties are compatible with the surrounding neighborhood and that special measures are taken, for unique uses, usually attached as conditions. The City has been divided into different types of zoning districts. What you may do with your property depends upon the district in which your property is located.

In each district, some uses are automatically permitted, some uses are permitted only if you apply for and are granted a use permit, and some uses are specifically prohibited. For example in R-1 Zoning District:

  • You are automatically permitted to build a single-family residence without applying for a use permit (You will need a building permit and other approvals, but you won’t need a use permit)
  • You must apply for and be granted a use permit to build a church, school, park, playground or to conduct a home occupation.
  • You may not build a store, warehouse or factory.

How do I apply for a Use Permit?

Your application may be prepared by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, licensed land surveyor, professional planner, or yourself and submitted to the Planning Department for review.  Your application must include a detailed description of the use you wish to make of the property (examples are: nature of the use, hours of operation, number of employees, etc.), the Assessor’s Parcel Number, and the name and address of the property owner and of the person making the application. Submit the following with your application:

  • Photographs of the property, a location map and a scaled plot plan showing everything that exists on the parcel (buildings and uses, parking area, driveways, well, septic system, setbacks, and lot dimensions) and proposed uses including signage, exterior lighting and landscaping.
  • A floor plan and the elevations of any proposed buildings.
  • A radius map showing all the parcels within 300 feet of your property and one stamped legal-size envelope for each property identified.

What happens after I apply?

The Planning Department will review your application and also refer it to various departments within the City who may request that conditions be attached to the approval of your use permit.  A project planner may visit the site.  Your application is reviewed by the Planning Director and may be recommended to the Planning Commission for approval, approval subject to conditions, or to be denied.  The application is then scheduled for a Planning Commission hearing at which neighbors or other interested persons may appear to support, object, or simply ask questions about your proposal. The Planning Department will announce the meeting by mailing notices to all owners of property within 300 feet of your property and by posting the agenda on the city hall bulletin board.

Depending upon the complexity of the project, the final decision may be made by the Planning Commission. Your application may be approved, approved subject to certain conditions (nearly all approvals do have conditions), or denied.

What determines whether my application will be approved?

Based on the information you supply and established criteria, the City determines whether the use you wish to make of your property will be detrimental to the public welfare or injurious, to property or improvements in the neighborhood.

What types of conditions might be imposed?

Your permit might be granted for a limited period of time, one year, for example, or you might be required to make certain property improvements before you can receive approval.  If your permit involves a business, you might have conditions placed on the hours you may be open or other operational issues

What can I do to give my application the best chance of approval?

  • When planning your project, consider how you can complete it in such away that it harmonizes with its surroundings and does not disrupt the neighborhood by creating undue noise or traffic.
  • You must demonstrate that your plan should be approved. When your application is submitted, make sure the most accurate information is provided.
  • Attend hearings so that you can speak for your project and respond to questions posed by those who may be worried about how your land use might affect them.

Can I appeal the decision?

During the 5-day appeal period after the Planning Commission’s decision is made, you and any other interested party may appeal the decision to the City Council. Even if your application is approved, you may still appeal any of the conditions that are attached.  The City Council may reverse, set aside, affirm, amend or modify the action of the Planning Commission.

How long does it take to get a Use Permit?

The entire process takes approximately three to four months from the time you submit a completed application to the day of the hearing by the Planning Commission. The Planning Department staff will assign a tentative hearing date when your application is complete.  Regular Planning Commission meetings are on the third Wednesday of each month.

What fees must I pay?

You must pay an application fee. You may also be required to pay fees for preparation and processing the City environmental review, archaeological review by the Northeast Information Center and environmental review by the Department of Fish & Game, and a County Clerk fee for posting the environmental determination.

What’s the next step in this process?

Obtain a Use Permit application packet from the Planning Department. The packet explains the general procedures for applying for a permit, fees, and other related matters. The application must be completed by a registered architect, registered civil engineer, licensed land surveyor, professional planner, or yourself and have notarized signature by the property owner or owners.

You should also review the section of the City Zoning Ordinance that regulates the uses permitted in the zone in which your project is located (a Planner can help you identify which section of the ordinance you need). After you have become familiar with these documents, we recommend you prepare some very preliminary plans and bring them to the Planning Department counter so that staff can review them.

If you are new to Weed or unfamiliar with the permit system you may also wish to make an appointment to meet with staff who can explain the permit system, the different agencies involved and the various costs and requirements. There is no charge for the meeting that can be scheduled by calling (530) 938-5020.